Schneider Photography & Design

Astrophotos

Total Solar Eclipse August 21, 2017

Solar Eclipse (1 hr before totality). Photosphere
Solar Eclipse (1 hr before totality). Photosphere
Solar Eclipse (3 min before totality). Chromosphere
Solar Eclipse (3 min before totality). Chromosphere
Totality 08-21-17
Totality 08-21-17
Large Solar Prominence
Large Solar Prominence
Solar Eclipse (25 sec after totality) Haze from smoke
Solar Eclipse (25 sec after totality) Haze from smoke
Solar Eclipse (40 min after totality). Chromosphere
Solar Eclipse (40 min after totality). Chromosphere
Solar Eclipse (eclipse ends in 13 min). Photosphere
Solar Eclipse (eclipse ends in 13 min). Photosphere
Sun after Eclipse. Chromosphere
Sun after Eclipse. Chromosphere
Sun after Eclipse. Photosphere
Sun after Eclipse. Photosphere

The Pleiades

Solar Flare

Image taken through a hydrogen-alpha solar telescope showing the Sun's layer called the chromosphere. The flare is the white ribbon coursing through the sunspot group below and right of center.

The Moon

Waxing Gibbous Moon
Waxing Gibbous Moon
Craters Aristarchus, Kepler, Copernicus
Craters Aristarchus, Kepler, Copernicus
Southeast Lunar Quadrant
Southeast Lunar Quadrant
Lunar Mare and Highlands
Lunar Mare and Highlands
Partial Lunar Eclipse
Partial Lunar Eclipse
Crater Tycho
Crater Tycho
Pollen Lunar Corona
Pollen Lunar Corona

Planetary Transits of the Sun

When Mercury and Venus pass directly between the Sun and the Earth as they move in their orbits, we see them as black dots on the face of the Sun; Mercury very small and Venus much larger. These are called transits. These images were taken through telescopes fitted with white light (visible spectrum) solar filters, which show the layer of the Sun called the photosphere. The black dots other than the planets are sunspots. A Mercury transit occurs about every 7 years. Venus transits occur 4 times in 234 years in an asymmetric pattern.


Venus Crescent Phase

Venus and Mercury show phases like the Moon does. As they orbit around the Sun, varying amounts of their surfaces visible to us are illuminated by sunlight. When Venus, for example, is positioned closest to Earth in its orbit, but not directly between Earth and Sun as in a transit, it is called inferior conjunction. Just like the New Moon, none of Venus' surface can be seen during inferior conjunction. This image of Venus was taken three weeks after inferior conjunction when 13% of its visible surface was illuminated. It was taken in broad daylight with an astro video camera and telescope using an IR-pass filter.

Orion's Belt and Sword

Night Sky Landscapes

Winter Milky Way and Constellations
Star Trails along Celestial Equator
Moonlit Clouds & Orion
Milky Way Band
Fisher Towers Star Trails
Milky Way at Bandon, OR
Circumpolar Star Trails
Milky Way From Oregon Forest
Deep Twilight at Fisher Towers
Night at Fisher Towers

Milky Way and Jupiter

The planet Jupiter is the bright "star" near the lower right end of the Milky Way.

All photos copyright Fred V Schneider